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Kristaps Bergs is a cellist and chamber musician from Riga, Latvia. He was born in the family of musicians and already in early age showed his passion for music. Cello playing has brought Kristaps to the most prestigious music venues like Carnegie Hall in New York, Walt Disney Hall in Los Angeles, Vienna Musikverein, Vienna Konzerthaus, Amsterdam Concertgebouw, Royal Albert Hall and Royal Festival Hall in London, Suntory Hall in Tokyo.

Kristaps made his soloist debut in 2005 in Riga Guild Hall with Andris Nelsons as the conductor and the Latvian National Symphony Orchestra where he performed Camille Saint-Saëns Cello Concerto in A minor. The same year he had an opportunity to work with the great maestro Mstislav Rostropovich who inspired Kristaps’ further development.

In 2006, Kristaps was accepted in the prestigious University for Music and Performing Arts in Vienna where he studied with Reinhard Latzko. In 2011, Kristaps was accepted into the class of the famous cellist and conductor Heinrich Schiff, who had an enormous influence on Kristaps. Along with his studies in Vienna, Kristaps participated in many master classes across Europe with artists like David Geringas, Frans Helmerson, Anner Bylsma, Arto Noras, Valter Dešpalj and others.

Kristaps has been among the winners of numerous national and international competitions including 1st prize in Johannes Brahms Competition in 2008, 1st prize in Carl Davidov Competition in 2006 and 1st prize in Augusts Dombrovskis Competition in 2005. He also has received several prizes from the Latvian Ministry of Culture for his outstanding success and promotion of Latvian music culture.

Kristaps has collaborated and performed with artists like Andris Nelsons, Heinrich Schiff, Ida Hendel, Eduard Schmieder, Reinhard Latzko, Christian Altenburger, Natalia Prischepenko, Giovanni Sollima, Helmut Lachenmann and others.

Thanks to a generous private sponsor Kristaps performs on a very special cello by Lorenzo Ventapane from Naples, Italy, dating from 1836.